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Women are more disciplined and dexterous: Ola Founder Bhavish Aggarwal

Bhavish Aggarwal, founder of Olacabs, stated that his company does not discriminate against married women, unlike Foxconn, which reportedly excludes them from job opportunities.

By Rashaad Ather
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Bhavish Aggarwal - Founder At Olacabs

Bhavish Aggarwal - Founder At Ola Cabs

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Olacabs' founder and managing director, Bhavish Aggarwal, was asked for his comments on reports of Foxconn’s discriminatory hiring practices against married women, to which he said his cab company has no such policy.

He emphasised that the domestic tech startup will continue to employ women, including married women, in its new facilities. 

“Women are more disciplined and dexterous. We have no policies like Foxconn to not hire married women. Women workforce in India is low and we are doing our part to solve this. While we right now hire for junior-level. We are also trying to hire more women employees for senior management as well,” Aggarwal said.

Earlier, Aggarwal wrote a passionate Ola Electric post relaying that Ola Future Factory is all set to be run entirely by women, employing over 10,000 women at full capacity, making it the world's largest women-only factory.

“Today, I am proud to announce that Ola Futurefactory, will be run entirely by women. We welcomed the first batch this week and at full capacity, Futurefactory will employ over 10,000 women, making it the world’s largest women-only factory and the only all-women automotive manufacturing facility globally.” Aggarwal wrote.

Report Against Foxconn's Hiring Policy:

A recent investigative report exposed Foxconn, Apple's largest supplier, for discriminating against married women at its iPhone factory in India. 

The report alleged that the company systematically excluded married women from job opportunities, citing concerns about their family responsibilities and post-marriage issues.

This discriminatory practice against a significant portion of the workforce has raised concerns for gender equality in major tech manufacturing companies.